邮件订阅
首页 > 新闻

艰难时世的赚钱之道:淘金iPhone App

我也说几句2009年04月10日 14:25分         作者:CNW.com.cn      来源:

摘要:不知道在目前的经济危机下,有什么好的办法能够确保稳定的收入吗?尝试一下为iPhone编写一个漂亮的程序吧。

关键字

iPhone App App Store

Is there a good way to nail down a steady income? In this economy? 

Try writing a successful program for the iPhone. 

Last August, Ethan Nicholas and his wife, Nicole, were having trouble making their mortgage payments. Medical bills from the birth of their younger son were piling up. After learning that his employer, Sun Microsystems, was suspending employee bonuses for the year, Nicholas considered looking for a new job and putting their house in Wake Forest, N.C., on the market. 

Then he remembered reading about the guy who had made a quarter-million dollars in a hurry by writing a video game called Trism for the iPhone. "I figured if I could even make a fraction of that, we'd be able to make ends meet," he said. 

Although he had years of programming experience, Nicholas, who is 30, had never built a game in Objective-C, the coding language of the iPhone. So he searched the Internet for tips and informal guides, and used them to figure out the iPhone software development kit that Apple puts out. 

Because he grew up playing shoot-em-up computer games, he decided to write an artillery game. He sketched out some graphics and bought inexpensive stock photos and audio files. 

For six weeks, he worked "morning, noon and night"--by day at his job on the Java development team at Sun, and after-hours on his side project. In the evenings he would relieve his wife by caring for their two sons, sometimes coding feverishly at his computer with one hand, while the other rocked baby Gavin to sleep or held his toddler, Spencer, on his lap. 

After the project was finished, Nicholas sent it to Apple for approval, quickly granted, and iShoot was released into the online Apple store on October 19. 

When he checked his account with Apple to see how many copies the game had sold, Nicholas's jaw dropped: On its first day, iShoot sold enough copies at $4.99 each to net him $1,000. He and Nicole were practically "dancing in the street," he said. 

The second day, his portion of the day's sales was about $2,000. 

On the third day, the figure slid down to $50, where it hovered for the next several weeks. "That's nothing to sneeze at, but I wondered if we could do better," Nicholas said. 

In January, he released a free version of the game with fewer features, hoping to spark sales of the paid version. It worked: iShoot Lite has been downloaded more than 2 million times, and many people have upgraded to the paid version, which now costs $2.99. On its peak day--Jan. 11--iShoot sold nearly 17,000 copies, which meant a $35,000 day's take for Nicholas. 

"That's when I called my boss and said, 'We need to talk,'" Nicholas said. "And I quit my job." 

To people who know a thing or two about computer code, stories like his are as tantalizing as a late-night infomercial, as full of promise as an Anthony Robbins self-help book. The first iPhones came out in June 2007, but it wasn't until July 2008 that people could buy programs built by outsiders, which were introduced in an online market--called the App Store--along with the new iPhone 3G. (The store is also open to owners of the iPod Touch, which does everything that the iPhone does except make phone calls and incur a monthly bill from AT&T.) 

There are now more than 25,000 programs, or applications, in the iPhone App Store, many of them written by people like Nicholas whose modern Horatio Alger dreams revolve around a SIM card. But the chances of hitting the iPhone jackpot keep getting slimmer: the Apple store is already crowded with look-alike games and kitschy applications, and fresh inventory keeps arriving daily. Many of the simple but clever concepts that sell briskly--applications, for instance, that make the iPhone screen look like a frothing pint of beer or a koi pond--are already taken. 

And for every iShoot, which earned Nicholas $800,000 in five months, "there are hundreds or thousands who put all their efforts into creating something, and it just gets ignored in the store," said Erica Sadun, a programmer and the author of "The iPhone Developer's Cookbook." 

The long-shot odds haven't stopped people from stampeding to classes and conferences about writing iPhone programs. At Stanford University, an undergraduate course called Computer Science 193P: iPhone Application Programming attracted 150 students for only 50 spots when it was introduced last fall. 

"It completely surpassed our expectations," said Troy Brant, a graduate student who helped teach the course. Turnout has been equally strong this semester, he said. 

As early as the summer of 2007--a week after the iPhone first hit the market, and long before Apple let outsiders sell software for it--Raven Zachary, a technology consultant, decided to organize an informal get-together for fans of the device. The event, held in San Francisco, drew nearly 500 people. 

Since then, he said, dozens of similar conferences have taken place around the world. "The concept has spread quite far and wide," said Zachary, who boasts on his Web site that he "directed the launch of two top-20 iPhone applications," including one for the Obama campaign. He expects the turnout at his conference this summer to be huge. "We may have to find a larger venue and hold simultaneous satellite events to accommodate attendees," he said. 

The rush to stake a claim on the iPhone is a lot like what happened in Silicon Valley in the early dot-com era, said Matt Murphy, a partner at the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers who oversees the iFund, a $100 million investment pot reserved for iPhone applications. 

"People are realizing that by developing in their garage with a couple dollars, they could be the next Facebook," he said. "It's still early days for mobile development, but those days are coming." 

This time, however, the scale may be smaller. While iShoot is never going to be the next Google or Facebook, it is the type of program that people with minimal expertise view as within their reach. The fact that Apple handles the financial side of the transactions makes it particularly easy for mom-and-pop developers to sell their homemade software all around the world. (Apple keeps 30 percent of the revenue from each sale and gives the rest to the developer.) 

"Even if you're not a programming guru, you can still cobble something together and potentially have great success," said James Katz, director of the Center for Mobile Communications Studies at Rutgers University. 

If there is ever an iPhone hall of fame, Nicholas' portrait might hang next to that of Kostas Eleftheriou, a young Greek entrepreneur who lives in London. He and two friends wrote a program in seven days called iSteam, which fogs up the face of an iPhone like a bathroom mirror. They made more than $100,000 in three months. 

It is little more than a party trick. When someone swipes a finger across the phone's surface, iSteam's pretend moisture is wiped away with a realistic-sounding squeak. When the phone is tipped on its side, droplets of condensation roll as if pulled by gravity. "It's quite a good illusion," Eleftheriou said. "Everyone wants to show their friends." 

The application hit the App Store in late December, and already Eleftheriou, who is 25, has decided to postpone graduate school and seek his fortune as an iPhone developer. He and his friends Vassilis Samolis and Bill Rappos, both 22, have set up a company called GreatApps and have hired two more developers. 

"We don't want to stop with iSteam," Eleftheriou said. "Our next step is to establish ourselves as a big player in the application store." 

Both the iSteam team and Nicholas were spurred by the success of Steve Demeter, an inspiration for starry-eyed iPhone developers. Demeter, who is 30, wrote the game called Trism, which involves aligning rows of brightly colored triangles; he released it into the App Store last July and says he made $250,000 in the first two months. He immediately quit his job writing software for Wells Fargo and started his own iPhone game development company, Demiforce. 

It doesn't take much money to write these programs, Demeter said, and a larger budget doesn't always mean more success. "Novel concepts that come out of left field are going viral," he said. "These are the kinds of applications that will endure." 

The mobile frenzy hasn't gone unnoticed by other major cellphone and software companies. Last week, Research in Motion opened an application store for the BlackBerry. Google recently began selling applications based on Android, its operating system for cellphones. Nokia is in the early stages of opening a store for its handsets, and Microsoft is creating a store for phones running Windows Mobile. 

As for Nicholas, he has sprung for a family vacation to Washington, hired a nanny and founded a company called Naughty Bits Software to keep developing iPhone programs (so far he is the only employee). "Oh, and I bought myself a new laptop," he said. "I figured I deserved that." 

He is in talks to adapt iShoot to systems other than the iPhone, and says that investors and big video game companies have approached him about financing his sophomore effort. He is also in full-swing inventor mode, working on a new game that he will not describe for fear that another developer might poach it. 

"I'm going to milk the gold rush as long as I can," Nicholas said. "It'd be foolish not to."

 

 

不知道在目前的经济危机下,有什么好的办法能够确保稳定的收入吗?尝试一下为iPhone编写一个漂亮的程序吧。

去年8月份,Ethan Nicholas和他的妻子Nicole在房款还贷上陷入了困境。与此同时,他们小儿子的出生也让家里的医疗开支逐渐加大。在得知自己工作的公司Sun Microsystems已经冻结发放今年雇员奖金后,Nicholas开始考虑寻找一份新的工作,并决定将他们位于北卡罗来纳州维克森林镇的房子卖掉。

此时,Nicholas突然想起自己曾经看到一则有人为iPhone编写了一个名为Trism的视频游戏在短时间内就挣了25万美元的消息。他称:“我在想,自己是否也能够赚到那个人的一小部分,这样我就能维持收支平衡了。”

现年30岁的Nicholas虽然拥有多年的编程经验,但是他还从来未使用iPhone的编程语言Objective-C编写过任何游戏。尽管如此,Nicholas在互联网上搜索到了一些小贴士和非正规的指导信息,并且通过这些资料搞清楚了苹果所推出的iPhone软件开发工具包。

由于Nicholas以前一直喜爱电脑上的射击类游戏(shoot-em-up),因此他决定编写一款射击游戏。做下决定后,Nicholas绘制了一些图形,此外他还以便宜的价格购买了一些素材图片和音频文件。

在接下来的六周时间里,Nicholas每天“上午、下午和晚上”夜以继日的工作,白天他在Sun的Java开发团队工作,业余时间Nicholas则潜心编写他的射击游戏。晚上为了缓解妻子的压力,Nicholas则一边帮助妻子照顾他们的两个儿子,一边编写程序。有时,Nicholas会用一只手在电脑上编写程序,而腾出另一只手摇他们的宝宝Gavin,让Gavin入睡。有时在编写程序的时候,Nicholas会腾出一只手,扶着他们初学会走路的儿子Spencer在自己膝上玩耍。

经过六周辛苦的编写,Nicholas终于完成了他的游戏编写。随后,Nicholas将游戏发给苹果审核,并且很快就得到了苹果的批准。10月9日,Nicholas编写的名为iShoot的游戏终于在Apple store上被推出。

在查看自己帐户,想知道自己编写的游戏出售了多少时,结果让Nicholas乐的合不拢嘴。在上架的第一天,下载金额为4.99美元的iShoot,一天内下载数竟让他净赚了1000美元。Nicholas自己称:“当时他和妻子乐的在大街上跳舞。”

第二天,一天的销售额飙升到了大约2000美元。第三天下降至50美元,并且维持数周相同水准。Nicholas称:“虽然这个结果足以引以为豪,但是我想知道我是否能够做的更好。”

在1月份,Nicholas为iShoot推出了一个去除了部分功能的免费版本,他希望这个免费版本能够带动付费版本的销售额。很快这一做法就收到了成效。iShoot的免费版iShoot Lite下载次数超过了200万次,同时许多人也开始去升级购买付费版的iShoot。目前付费版的iShoot售价仅为2.99美元。在巅峰时期--1月11日,iShoot一天就下载了1.7万次。这意味着Nicholas当天就赚了3.5万美元。Nicholas称:“那天我找了我的老板,我跟他说‘我们需要谈一下’。谈完后,我就辞掉了我的工作。”

对于熟悉计算机语言的人来说,Nicholas的故事就像午夜购物频道一样诱人,因为承诺比自助大师安东尼·罗宾斯(Anthony Robbins)的励志书中写的还要多。首批iPhone手机在2007年6月正式发售,但是直到2008年人们才开始购买由外部人员编写的程序。随着新一代iPhone 3G手机的推出,这些程序被放在一个名为App Store的在线商店被出售。(App Store同样向iPod Touch的用户开放。除了不能打电话,不用收到AT&T每月寄来的帐单外,iPod Touch功能与iPhone一样。)

目前App Store里面有超过2.5万个程序和应用软件,其中许多程序就是由像Nicholas这样的人编写的。只不过他们的现代霍雷肖·阿尔杰(Horatio Alger)梦是围绕着一张SIM展开的(注:霍雷肖·阿尔杰是美国著名作家、“美国梦”的积极倡导者,作品大多讲述穷孩子通过艰苦奋斗和勤奋诚实获得财富和社会成功的故事)。如今通过iPhone淘金的机率正在减少,因为App Store里已经充满了面孔相似的游戏和粗劣的应用软件。此外,每天都有新的创新出现在App Store里。许多简单但又不失巧妙的概念销售依然火爆,比如可以让iPhone的屏幕看起来像冒泡沫的啤酒或观赏鱼池一样的软件已经出现。

尽管iShoot在五个月里为Nicholas挣了80万美元,但是对于每一件像iShoot一样的软件来说并不一定可以为编程者带来丰厚的收益。作为一名程序员和“iPhone开发者食谱”(The iPhone Developer’s Cookbook)一书的作者,Erica Sadun称:“有成千上百的开发者竭尽所能希望做出一些了不起的应用程序,但是这些经过一番心血编写出来的程序可能会在App Store被人们所忽视。”

尽管胜算的机会渺茫,但仍然阻止不了人们蜂拥参加各种iPhone编程培训课程和研讨会。去年秋天,斯坦福大学开设了一门编号为193P的计算机科学本科课程:iPhone应用程序编程。这一课程吸引了超过150人挤在只有50个座位的教室里听课。

刚刚毕业担任该课程助教的Troy Brant称:“这完全超出了我们的预期。”他表示,这学期出席该课程的人也同样非常的多。

早在2007年夏天,在iPhone面市仅一周之后,距苹果允许第三方开发者销售iPhone应用软件还相当遥远的时候,技术市场咨询顾问Raven Zachary决定为iPhone的粉丝组织一个非正式的聚会。然而,这次在旧金山举行的聚会吸引了近500人参加。

Zachary表示,自那之后,有非常多的类似的聚会在全球各地举行。他在自己的网站上称:“这个概念很快传播到了四面八方。”此外,他还在自己的网站上称,在排名前20个iPhone应用软件中,他指导了两个,其中一个是支持奥巴马竞选的应用软件。他预计,今年夏季参加他的聚会的人会非常之多。他表示:“我们可能不得不换到更大的聚会地点,并通过卫星同步直播聚会活动。”

KPCB风险投资公司的合伙人Matt Murphy表示,这这些人蜂拥挤进App Store为自己立标定界(+微信关注网络世界),与当年硅谷在互联网泡沫时代早期十分相似。目前Murphy负责管理iFund,后者是KPCB为iPhone应用软件开发设立的总额为1亿美元的专项投资基金。

Murphy称:“人们意识到,只要在车库里花很少的钱中从事开发,他们就有可能成为下一个Facebook。现在仍然处于移动领域开发的早期,这样的日子正在到来。”  

尽管现在这一规模还相对较小,但是iShoot可能永远也不会成为下一个Google或者Facebook。因为它是那种开发者在这一领域甚至都不需要有专门的技术经验的程序。事实上,由于是苹果让这些家庭作坊式的开发者能够把他们的软件销售到全世界,因此苹果把持着他们的财务状况。(每一次付费应用下载,苹果获得销售收入的30%,剩下的70%归开发者。)

罗格斯大学移动通信研究中心主任James Katz称:“即便你不是什么编程高手,你仍然可以弄出一些简单但新奇的玩意儿,并有可能获得巨大的成功。”

如果有一个iPhone名人堂的话,Nicholas的肖像可能还要排在另一个叫做Kostas Eleftheriou的希腊企业家之后。因为这位住在伦敦的希腊企业家与他的两位朋友花了七天时间编写了一个叫做iSteam的程序。这个程序让iPhone屏幕看起来像是被雾气笼罩的浴室的镜子。然而就是这个程序3个月内为他们赚了超过10万美元。

iSteam只不过是个派对上的小诡计。当你的手指在iPhone的屏幕上滑过时,iSteam假装镜子上潮湿的水气被手指擦过,还会有手指在潮湿的玻璃上滑动时的吱吱的响声。当你把iPhone倾斜,液化凝结的那些小水滴又会沿着重力的方向滑落。Eleftheriou称:“它的视觉效果非常逼真。每个人都想把这个展示给他们的朋友看。”

这个应用软件在去年12月底才进入App Store。Eleftheriou也才 25 岁,如今他已经决定推迟大学毕业,追寻他作为iPhone开发者的财富。他和他的两个朋友,两个都是 22 岁的年轻人,Vassilis Samolis和Bill Rappos一起成立了一家名叫GreatApps的公司,他们还雇佣了其他两名开发者。

Eleftheriou称:“我们不想停留于iSteam的成功。我们的下一个目标是要让自己成为App Store里的重要参与者。 ”

不论是iSteam团队和Nicholas个人,他们都是受到了另一个叫做Steve Demeter的成功故事的刺激。今年30岁的Demeter编写了一个叫做Trism的游戏,游戏让用户调整各种颜色的三角形所在的行和列,使同一颜色的三角形聚在一起,以消去它们。这个游戏去年7月份就进入了App Store,并且前两个月就为Demeter挣了25万美元。Demeter立即辞去了他在美国富国银行的工作,并成立了他自己的iPhone游戏开发公司Demiforce 。

Demeter表示,编写这样的程序花不了太多的钱,反之,更多的预算并不意味着更多的成功。他称:“突发奇想的创意和概念只不过是一时的流行,但这才是那种能够持久存活的游戏。”

同样,那些大型手机制造商和软件公司也没有忽视这次移动领域的狂潮。上周,RIM宣布正式开放为黑莓手机准备的应用程序商店。谷歌也已经开始销售基于Android智能手机平台的应用程序。诺基亚也正在准备开放自己的应用程序商店,微软也正在为自己的Windows Mobile设立了软件商店。

对于Nicholas来说,此刻他们一家人正在华盛顿度假,Nicholas雇佣了一个保姆照看孩子并且成立了一家名叫 Naughty Bits Software的公司来继续开发iPhone应用程序(目前为止,他自己是公司唯一的雇员)。他称:“我给自己买了一台新的笔记本。我想这是我应得的奖励。”

Nicholas还计划把iShoot扩展到iPhone之外的移动平台上去。他表示目前已经有投资者和大型视频游戏公司正在着手为他的第二个尝试提供资金。目前Nicholas也正在全力开发另一个新的游戏,不过他拒绝描述游戏的内容或形式,以免被其他开发者过早模仿。Nicholas称:“只要可能的话,我会一直在这里淘金淘下去,不这么做是愚蠢的。”(范范编译)

 

 

 

 

我也说几句责任编辑:文山   联系邮箱:wen_shan@cnw.com.cn
更多相关专题
CES 2013 国际消费电子产品展
作为全世界规模最大的消费电子产品展,CES已经走过了46个年头。 网界网在关注大会新闻之外,为您传递更多来自业界的观点。
变化·趋势 网界网2012年终特辑
回顾2012网络世界,感受网络的震撼力量。观察变化中的网络,将飞快流转的IT时代里需要铭记的一切定格。
我也说几句
  • 本周TOP10
  • 本月TOP10
最新发布
更多重磅专题
深信服推出一站式桌面云解...
深信服推出一站式桌面云解决方案
Fortinet全方位安全产品与...
Fortinet公司是全球领先的网络安全设备供应商和统一威胁管理(UTM)市场领...
RSA安全大会2013全程直击
RSA大会是信息安全界最有影响力的业界盛会。21年来,RSA大会一直吸引着世界...